The Caribbean Binder

Covers mostly Caribbean but also Latin American issues, contemporary or otherwise.

lati-negros:

Cornel West on the historical relationship between the Puerto Rican and Black Liberation movements.

#FreeOscarLopez

Vio

"How do we make sure we don’t look at each other through white supremacist lens?"

artmusicvegan:

Two documentaries by filmmaker Jeanette Kong. Watch the trailers and read more HERE.

'Half: The Story of a Chinese-Jamaican Son'| “Caught between two cultures and races – Vincent Lee was born to a Chinese father and a Jamaican mother. After his father’s pre-mature death, five-year-old Vincent sailed across the ocean to southern China”…

'The Chiney Shop' | From the 1930s to the 1970s, Chinese-owned groceries were located on the street corners of rural and urban Jamaica. filmmaker Jeanette Kong grew up in a Chinese-owned shop in Kingston and details the complex relationship and social interaction between shop-owners and locals. 

(via wocinsolidarity)

Cartes postales et photos anciennes des Antilles Caraïbes.

diasporadash:

This website is IT. \O/ 

(Source: diasporadash)

sinidentidades:

Asian and Latino Artists Weigh In On a Changing America

If you want to put faces to the story of America’s changing demographics, you might want to look in an art museum. Long bastions of traditional (read “white”) American identity, a growing number of institutions—from the Whitney Museum and MoMA PS1 in New York City, to the Milwaukee Art Museum to the Oakland Museum of California—are opening their doors to artists of color whose work is both poignant and unabashedly political. 

That was the case on August 6 and 7 in Washington, D.C., where the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American and Latino Centers hosted a joint Asian-Latino pop-up exhibition featuring the work of some of today’s most sought-after visual storytellers. (For a full look at last week’s pop-up exhibition, check out the entire collection on Tumblr.) Colorlines.com caught up a few of the featured artists to talk about what their work means in the context of a changing American landscape. Here’s what they had to say:

Fidencio Martinez, based in Iowa City, Iowa. “Being an American to be is not defined by a piece of paper. We share a love for this country, for the people who raised us. It’s an honor for my work to be shown at the Smithsonian because it feels like I’ve finally been accepted.”

Steve Alfaro, based in Washington, D.C. “It’s hard [for me] to define what’s ‘American’ and it should be hard for anyone else to define that, too.  When you see a debate through an artist’s lens, you can actually sit with it and draw your own conclusions.” 

Favianna Rodriguez, based in Oakland, Calif. “We are bombarded with a narrative that’s consistently dehumanizing us and showing us in an ugly and negative way. I always think about art as fighting back against those narratives and saying that we love ourselves.”

Monica Ramos, based in Brooklyn, N.Y., by way of the Philippines  “I don’t think it was my intention to challenge what it means to be an American but that’s what my work brings out within the context of [the Smithsonian] show. Making it was my own personal interest. Food is the easiest way to get into a culture and represent it. It’s my way of always remembering where I’m from.”

(via nuestrahermana)

diasporadash:

Slave revolts in Puerto Rico: conspiracies and uprisings, 1795-1873
by Guillermo A. Baralt
From the emergence of the first sugar plantations up until 1873, when slavery was abolished, the wealth amassed by many landowners in Puerto Rico derived mainly from the exploitation of slaves. But slavery generated its antithesis - disobedience, uprisings and flights. This book documents these expressions of collective resistance.

diasporadash:

Slave revolts in Puerto Rico: conspiracies and uprisings, 1795-1873

by Guillermo A. Baralt

From the emergence of the first sugar plantations up until 1873, when slavery was abolished, the wealth amassed by many landowners in Puerto Rico derived mainly from the exploitation of slaves. But slavery generated its antithesis - disobedience, uprisings and flights. This book documents these expressions of collective resistance.

(Source: diasporadash, via wocinsolidarity)

newyorker:

In this week’s issue, Jon Lee Anderson writes about the Cuban novelist Leonardo Padura, and about Cuba’s complex, troubled history with its writers and artists: http://nyr.kr/H60BLC

A look at Rena Effendi’s photographs of Havana, where we see a city almost frozen in time: http://nyr.kr/16lnssC

Top: A family inside of an old wooden house in San Francisco de Paula, an outlying suburb of Havana, where Hemingway used to live.

Bottom-Left: A couple dancing salsa on their doorstep, in San Francisco de Paula.

Bottom-Right: A man loads produce for the state-owned fresh-food market in Regla.

(Source: newyorker.com)

caribbeanwriters:


Austin Clarke presents part one of his memoirs “Growing Up Stupid Under The Union Jack”, which chronicles the story of his childhood in Barbados. A previous novel, “The Polished Hoe” won a Giller prize in 2002. 

reclaimingthelatinatag:

“I always doubted auditioning because of my weight. I’ve always acted and pursued theater – it was something I had always wanted to do when I was young. But I felt I would be rejected because of my physical appearance. 
[Orange is the New Black] has given me the opportunity to show that I have curves and I have talent too. It’s been a battle, you know, because I’ve never been skinny. But I’ve embraced it. Now I have the opportunity to show everyone that this is sexy. I can dress in the same attire as someone else and carry myself in a sexy manner, a beautiful manner and a prideful manner. What matters is how I play the role – not my size.” 
—Dominican actress Dascha Polanco talks Netflix series “Orange is the New Black.” | Image via Vulture 

reclaimingthelatinatag:

“I always doubted auditioning because of my weight. I’ve always acted and pursued theater – it was something I had always wanted to do when I was young. But I felt I would be rejected because of my physical appearance. 

[Orange is the New Black] has given me the opportunity to show that I have curves and I have talent too. It’s been a battle, you know, because I’ve never been skinny. But I’ve embraced it. Now I have the opportunity to show everyone that this is sexy. I can dress in the same attire as someone else and carry myself in a sexy manner, a beautiful manner and a prideful manner. What matters is how I play the role – not my size.” 

Dominican actress Dascha Polanco talks Netflix series “Orange is the New Black.” | Image via Vulture 

nationalpostsports:

Haitians get a chance to skate on ice at a basketball gym that has been transformed to host the upcoming event, “Haiti On Ice” in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013.

The unlikely idea to put on an ice show in Haiti arose last year after Francois Yrius of Super Canal Prod, the Guadeloupe exhibition company organizing the show, met Haiti’s tourism minister, Stephanie Villedrouin, at a music festival in Guadeloupe.

She urged Yrius to hold an ice show in Haiti and convinced him to lay aside concerns over how much it would cost and the other complications of putting on such a spectacle in a poor country.

(Dieu Nalio Chery/The Associated Press)

(via roscoemcnally)